First 3 National Parks in the United States

First 3 National Parks in the United States

Nia Goulishev, Journalist

Have you ever wondered what led to the start of National Parks? Or when the National Park Service was created? Well, your lingering thought will be shortly answered.

In 1906, Theodore Roosevelt, who was president at that time, signed the Antiquities Act. That gave presidents the right to make national monuments to preserve places with natural or historic purposes in lands that are open to the public. This act was also mainly made to protect very old Native American artifacts.

President Woodrow Wilson signed an act on August 25, 1916, creating the National Park Service. The National Park Service was created in hope of protecting and preserving natural and historic lands.

The first National Park to be established was Yellowstone. Yellowstone, with all its beauty and sights to see, is located in Wyoming and was established on March 1, 1872. Yellowstone is known for its glaciers. The top 3 attractions in Yellowstone are Old Faithful, Grand Prismatic Spring, and Yellowstone Lake. To the right is a photo of the famous Grand Prismatic Spring, which is the largest hot spring in the US and third in the world. In the past, many tribes lived in Yellowstone, using it as their home and as a way for hunting and transportation.

Sequoia National Park was the second national park in the United States. Sequoia was established on September 25, 1890, and is located in California. This park was added to the National Park Service in order to protect that area’s giant trees from being logged and cut down. Sequoia is home to the world’s biggest tree, The General Sherman Tree. Which is located in the Giant Forest in Sequoia National Park. The first people known to live in this area were the Monache Indians. 

 

 

The third National Park I’ll be talking about is Yosemite. Yosemite National Park was established on October 1, 1890, as the third National Park. Yellowstone is home to more than 400 species of animals due to its diverse geological features. Yosemite also has one of the tallest waterfalls in the world, named Yosemite Falls. It’s made up of three separate falls. Upper Yosemite Fall, middle cascades, and Lower Yosemite Fall all make up Yosemite Falls.

To conclude, there are many National Parks in the United States, and each one has its own beauties and sights to see. Every one of the 422 National Parks in the United States is unique and has its own special characteristics. On your next trip, if you happen to pass by a National Park, you might as well stop by and enjoy the fresh air and beauty around you.

 

Sources:

https://www.nps.gov/yell/learn/historyculture/index.htm

https://www.oldest.org/nature/national-parks-usa/

https://www.nps.gov/yose/index.htm

https://www.nps.gov/yose/learn/news/yose120.htm

https://www.nps.gov/yell/index.htm

https://www.nps.gov/articles/quick-nps-history.htm#:~:text=On%20August%2025%2C%201916%2C%20President,those%20yet%20to%20be%20established

https://www.history.com/topics/us-government/national-park-service#:~:text=In%201906%2C%20President%20Theodore%20Roosevelt,Native%20American%20ruins%20and%20artifacts

https://www.softschools.com/facts/national_parks/sequoia_national_park_facts/2931/

https://www.doi.gov/blog/9-things-you-didnt-know-about-yosemite-national-park

https://www.nationalparks.org/connect/blog/how-many-national-parks-are-there

https://www.google.com/travel/things-to-do/see-all?g2lb=2502548%2C4258168%2C4270442%2C4306835%2C4317915%2C4328159%2C4371334%2C4401769%2C4419364%2C4428793%2C4433754%2C4459385%2C4463263%2C4463671%2C4464463%2C4466981%2C4270859%2C4284970%2C4291517&hl=en-US&gl=us&un=1&dest_mid=%2Fm%2F08874&dest_state_type=sattd&dest_src=ts&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj1kK33qL3tAhVVJTQIHQHSDrMQ69EBKAEwAnoECAMQHw#ttdm=44.344925_-110.783142_9&ttdmf=%252Fm%252F0164xv

Photos:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/yellowstone-national-park/

https://www.wildlandtrekking.com/yosemite/day-hike-tours/yosemite-falls.html

http://content.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2006404_2006095_2006110,00.html

https://www.nps.gov/index.htm