The Blue and Gold

Impressionism Explained

Back to Article
Back to Article

Impressionism Explained


Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






By Jane Oh

       What do the visible, vivid brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s Starry Night and Renoir’s lively scene of the Luncheon of the Boating Party share in common? The two paintings are both works of an art style called Impressionism, which challenged society with a new methodology and perspective on painting. The Impressionist movement opened up a doorway to new works, which shaped art’s history and influenced what today’s modern art looks like.

Impressionism, Claude Monet

 

 

Impressionism enters

       The Impressionist art movement began in the 1860s in France. During this time, people valued realism paintings that displayed a moment’s every detail. The brushstrokes of realism were barely visible, as the strokes were very small. Realism paintings also tended to include important, well-known figures and fine art was seen as a luxury that only well educated or rich people could create and decipher

       For these reasons, when an established art critic group, called the Salon in France, saw the works of Impressionism amongst realistic paintings, they claimed the unfinished look, visible brushstrokes, and vague details left merely an “impression” of reality. They found Impressionism to be the work of untalented, amature common people that were not skilled professionals in art. Society did not take the new style of artwork seriously.

Starry Night, Vincent Van Gogh

 

 

Growth and change

       Although Impressionists struggled to be taken seriously at first, their work was beginning to be noticed and appreciated by more people. As more artworks and shows were displayed, the term Impressionism quickly became favored by the public.

       People began to enjoy the vibrant use of color and light in paintings that portrayed a large variety of common scenes. More people were able to relate to the Impressionist artworks that showed daily activities or scenes, often taking place outside, capturing the colors and feel of a moment.

       By the 1870s and 1880s, Impressionism artwork became most popular and spread out of France to different cities across Europe, and eventually, to more artists in the world. Several Impressionist artists, such as Claude Monet, became very successful and wealthy from selling original paintings.

 

Artists of Impressionism

Claude Monet, born in France during 1840, was one of the leading artists of the Impressionist movement. His paintings are well known for taking place outdoors, often including bright colors and elements of natural sunlight. Monet’s painting career became a success, and he is known today for painting the water lilies in his garden.

Water Lilies, Claude Monet

 

 

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, another leading artist of the Impressionist period, is known for painting everyday events of people’s lives. Unlike Monet who focused on nature and the outdoors, Renoir focused on capturing more detail of people’s daily activities.

Luncheon of the Boating Party, Pierre-Auguste Renoir

 

 

Edgar Degas was different from other Impressionist painters in the fact that he did not enjoy painting outdoors. He prefered to paint inside, away from nature and plants, capturing scenes of people indoors. For example, Degas loved to paint ballerinas in classes, theatres, or backstage. The stage lights shadowing down on the ballerinas allowed him to incorporate perspectives of light into his artwork. Degas also experimented with other mediums of art, creating sculptures or using materials such as pastel in his works.

The Ballet Class, Edgar Degas

 

 

Impact

       The world shifted a change in art of detailed realism to bright colors and visible brushstrokes leaving an impression. Impressionism allowed more people to connect to artwork, and it opened up art to a larger audience than before. The paintings helped bring people together in society through art, as everybody quickly admired the paintings that captured moments so vividly. It changed the styles and expected criteria of “good” art.

       Impressionism was a unique method of art that managed to preserve a scene with emotion through lively brushstrokes, ensuring the beauty of those seemingly little moments will always be remembered.

 

Claude Monet at his home’s garden located in Giverny, France in 1925.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Impressionism Explained

    Arts and Entertainment

    VOCALOID

  • Impressionism Explained

    Arts and Entertainment

    Top 10 Albums Of 2018

  • Impressionism Explained

    Arts and Entertainment

    Undertale

  • Impressionism Explained

    Announcements

    Hybrid Dogs Perfect For Your You

  • Impressionism Explained

    Arts and Entertainment

    The Strangest Fruits

  • Impressionism Explained

    Arts and Entertainment

    New and Upcoming Movies

  • Impressionism Explained

    Arts and Entertainment

    The Panic! At The Disco Trilogy

  • Impressionism Explained

    Arts and Entertainment

    How Much Money Do Beauty Gurus Make?

  • Impressionism Explained

    Arts and Entertainment

    Highway Numbers

  • Impressionism Explained

    Arts and Entertainment

    Adopting Pets

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of Bowditch Middle School
Impressionism Explained